Intensive building / Europan 13

Etude urbaine, logements

coupe batiment Europan 13
 
 

This architectural project tries to explore what “common spaces” could represent in our contemporary cities. The site chosen for the project is La Marina del Port Vermell in Barcelona, a city that has suffered one of the hardest housing bubbles and mortgage crisis in the last years. This particular economic context, along with new forms of socially engaged politics at the town council, have made of Barcelona a pilot city where new relations between housing needs and architectural sustainability, neighborhood associations’ social demands, green spaces and urban energy can be explored. The new city council, under the name of Barcelona en Comú [Barcelona in Common], has engaged with the need of rethinking not only new ways to transform the public space into common space, but also how to remunicipalize services and people’s housing and their common needs.
This building should be the first step of a global urban connection of intensive buildings providing energy, biodiversity and social common spaces where residents are engaged actively in the system.
The project involves a rethinking of the common and the general possibilities of the sharing in the field of architecture. It engages with the ways of living that we are capable of transforming collectively and, as Catalan philosopher Marina Garcés has recently written, as a reality that we develop together at the intersections of collective action and tradition.

Information Complémentaire

Ville

Barcelone

Maitrise d'oeuvre

Atemps architecture, Edouard Danais architecte, Louise Pielat paysagiste

SP

6250 m²

Livraison

concours ouvert

Description du Produit

What can we think?

This architectural project tries to explore what “common spaces” could represent in our contemporary cities. The site chosen for the project is La Marina del Port Vermell in Barcelona, a city that has suffered one of the hardest housing bubbles and mortgage crisis in the last years. This particular economic context, along with new forms of socially engaged politics at the town council, have made of Barcelona a pilot city where new relations between housing needs and architectural sustainability, neighborhood associations’ social demands, green spaces and urban solar energy can be explored.
The new city council, under the name of Barcelona en Comú [Barcelona in Common], has engaged with the need of rethinking not only new ways to transform the public space into common space, but also how to remunicipalize services and people’s housing and their common needs.

Taking into account this two-fold context –economic crisis and social responsibility–, this project engages with the problem of housing and our contemporary ecologic demands so as to make possible new relationships between architecture, economy, needs and meaning.

What can we build?

What can be build for this housing project will be intimately related to the possibilities and the limits of its energy resources, income and revenues, as well as Barcelona’s modern architectural tradition and specific environment and climate.

The main concern of the building involves both sustainability issues and the energy problem along with the question of the social space. On the one hand, the presence of vertical gardens and vegetal barriers minimize pollution and protect biodiversity. So they will be conceived as the continuity between the green areas at Delta de Llobregat and Montjuïc hill. On the other hand, green corridors also work as sustainable urban cells that lead us to think about new methods of energy storage for the neighborhood’s community (their electrical cars and other community needs). Finally, vegetal areas contribute to build shared spaces promoting social interaction.
Another important aspect of the project is the choice of the form and materials in terms of adaptability to the architectural environment and climate.
The building is recovered with a double skin structure in order to produce different climate effects through the different seasons. During the summer, the façades provided with colored and mobile photovoltaic cells that allow air circulation and can be oriented towards the sun.
The glazed openings in conjunction with the vegetal filter purify and refrigerate the air thanks for evapotranspiration. In the winter, the photovoltaic cells are closed but they still receive sunlight because the deciduous plants will have no leaves, producing a glasshouse effect where temperature and hygrometry are under control. The building works then as an empty space that stores heat and solar energy throughout the day. The whole conception of the housing follows a bioclimatic logic that tries to promote self-sufficiency and self-subsistence, as well as the sharing of energy storing.

The building should be the first step of a global urban connection of intensive buildings providing energy, biodiversity and social common spaces . It also promotes that the residents engage actively in the general functioning of the housing system: the kitchen gardens, the compost, the orientation of the glass photovoltaic cells and their temperature, etc.

What can we dream about?

The project involves a rethinking of the common and the general possibilities of the sharing in the field of architecture. It engages with the ways of living that we are capable of transforming collectively and, as Catalan philosopher Marina Garcés has recently written, as a reality that we develop together at the intersections of collective action and tradition.


Warning: call_user_func() expects parameter 1 to be a valid callback, no array or string given in /home/atemps/www/wp-content/themes/mrtailor/woocommerce/single-product/tabs/tabs.php on line 37